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Introduction

A bit about my photography and me

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I have been interested in photography for a number of years. Until last year I used my camera on Auto. I hesitated to use any of the other modes because I didn’t understand them.

Last year I stepped outside my comfort zone and took an evening class in photography which challenged me to produce a set of 6 photos on a theme, mine was dance. At the end of the course a selection of the images I produced were included in the college end of year show, along with a couple of the other students on the course.

At the start of this year I returned to college and took a further evening class on black and white film development.

Both courses increased my enthusiasm for photography and pushed me to explore what I was able to do.

MDG_1076
Interaction with the audience, Hoots n Hooters, 37 Club, Puriton Somerset – 8th April 2017 (Nikon D7200 ISO 6400 1/30 sec, f/1.8 50mm)

I considered doing A Level Photography at the local college but it’s during the day time so would mean juggling work. Then I discovered the OCA and gave serious thought to doing a photography degree. It’s still what I would like to do but discovering the Foundation course gave me the chance to try out studying again and see how I get on. With luck at the end of the course I’ll be ready to go on and do a degree.

 

Thoughtful Snowy
Thoughtful Snowy (Nikon D7200 ISO 400, 1/640 sec , f/2.8, 40mm)

 

I have plenty of subjects that are willing to let me take their photos and I live in Somerset so have a lot of wonderful countryside to explore with my camera.

Camera equipment wise, I have a Nikon D7200 with a number of lenses, and a Nikomat EL 35m which I’m still getting used to; the set of photos I had developed from it had some flaws which might be due to the cameras age and condition. I also have an electronic flash, some filters, tripods and a monopod. Oh, and last year I had a portable camera studio set up for my birthday.

So to end who am I?

Well I’m a 50 year old married woman with a grown up son, who has terminal cancer. He is my inspiration in life. I work full time as a computer consultant, photography is one of my main creative outlets; that and the occasional bit of writing and dancing (burlesque and hopefully soon pole). Being able to photograph my friends who dance, and even other performers, to a high standard is one of the places I want to get with my photography.

 

 

Diane Arbus: Portrait of a Photographer

Lubow, A. (2016) Diane Arbus: Portrait of a Photographer. Great Britain: Jonathan Cape (Part of Penguin Random House group)

Diane Arbus is an American photographer, born on the 14th March 1923, she died on the 26th July 1971 after taking an overdose of barbituates and slashing her wrists.

One of the most talented photographers of her generation, her peers were people like Robert Franks, Richard Avedon, she is known for her photographs of people who were on the margins of society. Sideshow freaks, nudists, transgender people (although this was before the term was coined), and others who were outside what was thought normal.

Arbus sought out the unusual, the ugly, the different in her subjects.

All through her career Diane Arbus struggled, never making enough money to be comfortable, she found herself resorting to undertaking photographic assignments in order to be able to keep her head above water and provide for her two daughters Doon and Amy.

Even so, she was able to find the time and opportunities to take the photos that she wanted.

Arbus was never totally satisfied with her work and never gave herself the credit she deserved, and that others gave her.

Born into the Nemerov family, who owned Russek’s department store on Fifth Avenue, she grew up unaffected by the Great Depression that was going on at the time. In 1941 she married her childhood sweetheart Allan Arbus, and they worked together as fashion photographers, Allan being the photographer with Diane assisting him during shoots. Together they travelled around the world on assignments.

Eventually Allan gave up photography and turned to acting, being known for his role as Dr. Sidney Freedman, a psychiatrist, in the hit US series M.A.S.H.

While Allan turned to acting, Diane became the photographer.

Lubow’s book paints a picture of a woman who struggled throughout her life. Never fully believing in her success and just managing to keep things together.

Arbus had many friends and acquaintances, both male and female, some of which became lovers. Her relationships with some male friends being complex, especially, when they became involved with other people and even married.

Although Diane Arbus never got the recognition she deserved while alive, posthumously she achieved it. One of her photographs sold for over $750,000 some time after her death.

The book is an interesting insight into Arbus, her life, her struggles and even her thought processes at times.

It’s also not an easy or quick read, at over 730 pages, including acknowledgments and source citations.

Having finished the book, the thing that I take away from it the most is that, no matter how talented the photographer, whether amateur or professional, this field can be a struggle to be successful. It is also possible to be blind to your abilities and to have a lack of faith in yourself, despite what others tell you.

Arbus’ story also shows that you should always strive to do the work that you want, even if you have to do other things along the way.

Finally, it also shows just how important it is to be able to look at the world and see the beauty and fascinating in things that society would shy away from normally.

A Staged Photograph (Submission)

Brief

The brief for the assignment was to produce either:-

  • A staged photograph
  • Or to make a narrative sequence

Research

When I started thinking about this assignment I happened to be reading through Photography: The Whole Story and decided to see if it had anything about staged photography. It did. A lot.

One part had a photograph by Jeff Wall called Double Self-Portrait, MoMa (2007). Seeing this sparked the idea of doing something similar, using the simplest technique I could to produce the image.

Gregory Crewdson

The course notes suggested looking at Crewdson’s work found at http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/p/gregory-crewson/

Gregory Crewdsons work is “is meticulously planned and staged, in particular the lighting. In some instances, extra lighting and special effects such as artificial rain or dry ice are used to enhance a natural moment of twilight. In others, the effect of twilight is entirely artificially created.”

The link to Crewdson’s work relates to his work Twilight and contains a number of examples of the images he produced for that project. When looking at some of these images it is easy to imagine that some of them were caught at the exact right moment, in some of the others it is obvious that the scene is staged. For instance in his image of a car in the middle of a junction with a door wide open. There is no reason for the door being open, which leaves you wondering what is happening, has someone got out of the car, is the door open ready for someone to get in?

Another image that suggests it is staged is set outside a supermarket. The figure and car at the front of the scene suggest someone putting groceries in their car but the figures stance appears unnatural, almost mannequin like.

Loh. A, Vescovi. A, (2015) has an example of the image that stood out for me. It is of a woman stood alongside a car, with a bag of groceries on the bonnet and a second bag, spilled on the ground. A girl sits in the passenger seat while another girl stands in front of the car with her head down, only wearing underwear.

The woman by the car has a disappointed, disapproving look on her face.

The girl in front of the car has marks across her back.

What makes this image stand out for me is the figure of the girl. She has short hair, her arms are positioned in such a way that they hide parts of her body. It is a very androgynous look which leaves the possibility that this is not quite as it seems, is the figure actually a girl?

Untitled from Twilight - Gregory Crewdon - VAM.AC.UK
Untitled from Twilight – Gregory Crewdon – VAM.AC.UK

Hannah Starkey

Tate (un-dated) shows an example of Hannah Starkey’s work from 1999. The image is of two women in a bathroom/changing room. The arm of one of the women is partially in the shot but what you see of them is mainly their reflections, and the reflections of their reflections. Starkey has cleverly positioned the camera so that the woman closest to the mirror is visible between the first reflection of the second woman and her reflection in the mirror she is looking into. Almost as if the first woman is coming between the second woman and her reflection.

Starkey’s work involves staged scenes and the use of actors, Saatchi Gallery (2018). Her work explores “everyday experiences and observations of inner city life from a female perspective”, Wikipedia (2018) .

Starkey’s work also involves the use of mirrors, reflections and smoke. In an interview with Diarmuid Costello, The Telegraph (2011), Hannah Starkey about the use of mirrors in her work acts as an escape route in the image.

Starkey’s images are also very static with no obvious movement and no sense that the participants are conversing with each other. This is her way of ensuring that the images aren’t a mass of contradictions.

Final Images

Watching the Performers

For this assignment I roped in my friends Batty and Redd as models.

Each set of photos uses a single model who is both performing as well as watching the performance. To achieve the results the camera was set up on a tripod and a set of photos taken with the model performing. A second set of photos was then taken with them acting as audience. These photos were cropped using Photoshop and then using the Photomerge option, available from Adobe Bridge were merged together to create a single new image.

Fire Bat

Fire Bat - 01Fire Bat - 02Fire Bat - 03

Fire Bat - 04

Redd Wyne

Redd Wynn - 03Redd Wynn - 02Redd Wynn - 01

Reflection

This assignment allowed me to use a number of different skills and technique. Joining two images together wasn’t something I’d done a lot of before. It allowed me to explore the capabilities of Lightroom, Photoshop and Bridge.

I allowed the models to do their own thing with regards to movement and position, just as long as they stayed in the appropriate side of the shot.

I’m happy with both sets of images and feel both tell a story. Although I would like to revisit the second shoot but to take a bit more time over it.

This assignment reinforced the fact that I enjoy taking photos of people performing.

Contact Sheets

 

 

References

  1. Tate (un-dated) Hannah Starkey born 1971 Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/hannah-starkey-2683 [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  2. Saatchi Gallery (2018) Hannah Starkey: Selected works by Hannah Starkeey Available at:   https://www.saatchigallery.com/artists/hannah_starkey.htm [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  3. Wikipedia (2018) Hanna Starkey Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Starkey [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  4. Artnet (2018) Hanna Starkey Available at:  http://www.artnet.com/artists/hannah-starkey/ [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  5. The Telegraph (2011) Hanna Starkey: In Conversation Available at:  https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/photography/8283609/Hannah-Starkey-In-Conversation.html [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  6. Loh. A, Vescovi. A, (2015) Interview with the Photographer Available at: http://theamericanreader.com/interview-with-photographer-gregory-crewdson/ [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  7. MoMA (2007) Jeff Wall – In His Own Words. Available at: https://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2007/jeffwall/ [Accessed 5 June 2018]

 

Re-Photographing

The brief for this exercise was:

Portrait

  1. Take a photo of a person’s face.
  2. Make a print about life-size and ask your model to affect their portrait – the print. The purpose here is to allow the sitter’s personality to affect their appearance. They can do anything to the print from drawing the classic spectacles and missing tooth to writing on it or cutting and tearing.
  3. When they’re done, ask the model to hold the print up to their face, possibly so that the features match, and make another photograph of the model. Of course this will depend on what they’ve done with the print.
  4. Print out this photo. It’s the second remove from ‘reality’ and it represents two distinct times and two experiences. In this way, the resulting photograph contains a creative process.

Final Images

So using my readily available model, I took several shots of them which I adjusted in Lightroom, exported out to jpeg files and then printed off. These were then handed over for them to alter in whichever way they saw fit. Further photographs were then taken while they held up the photograph in front of their face, as per the brief.

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Conclusion

I’ve not included contact sheets for this exercise and only included a subset of the images taken for this exercise. Just enough to demostrate that I’ve fulfilled the brief. After I’ve received feedback on assignment 3 I’ll take this post down because Tracey is very sensitive to her appearance.

 

 

Documenting Change

“Everything changes, weathers, grows or otherwise shows signs of transformation.”

The brief for this exercise was to make a sequence of photographs that shows the same subject, but in different states.

Any subject can be chosen but it needs to be clearly identified and the conditions of change that are to be shown need to be noted.

The end result of the exercise is to produce at least three images in the sequence that show the subjects different states and communicates the changes you’ve identified.


This exercise came up just a few days and weeks to late for me to make full use of some changes that were going on near where I live. There has been a lot of roadworks going on recently which has resulted in some major amounts of change.

One of the changes was the removal of a large amount of trees and grass opposite the entrance to a local superstore. By the time I reached this exercise all of the trees and grass had been removed. However, the intention is for further work to be done and so even missing the start of the changes documenting the rest of the work is entirely possible.

Another major change that was going on was the addition of traffic lights at a roundabout near to where I work. The work has caused a lot of problems because of narrowed lanes reducing the flow of traffic. Again the work had already started by the time this exercise came up but documenting the rest of the changes was again possible.

The final thing that I’m considering for this exercise is to photograph one of the trees outside the church I attend. Last year I took some photos of the tree when it was full of blossoms. Documenting the change that the tree goes through, from bare branches, through it full of blossoms until it is full of leaves would be an interesting activity.

All of the options above reflect growth and transformation.

By documenting all four I’m fulfilling one of the pieces of feedback I received for assignment 2, to shoot a range of options for each project and exercise.

One of the things that this exercise has highlighted for me, is the need to be aware of what is going on in the area you live and any changes that may be happening, because you never know when taking you camera out and photographing what is happening might be useful.

Final Images

The photos I decided upon for the final set of images were taken across the road from the church. The focus of the images is one of the trees whose branches were bare at the time I started the exercise. Over time buds appeared on the branches which were then followed by blossoms.

Exercise 3.4 - St James Church-6108Exercise 3.4 - St James Church-6842Exercise 3.4 - St James Church-7157

I’ve also included some close ups of the tree showing the changes is has undergone.

 

 

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Contact Sheets

 

 

Mixing Genres

The brief for this exercise was:

How could you mix genres together in one photograph?
Lets keep it simple and stick to the three easiest genres: landscape, portrait and still life (though you are free to use which ever genre you want.)
Choose a subject you’d like to photograph. It can be anything at all, a place, a person, an object or a story. Take your subject and add to it elements of the other genres.
This isn’t about chucking together random subjects – what you’re looking for is an effective, telling mix. For example, you could place a friend outside the house where she was born holding the wedding ring of her mother. Can you understand how each of theses elements resonates with each other?

Subject

The easiest genre for me to photograph is landscape. Where I live I have easy access to the countryside. The country park a few miles from Yeovil has views out over lowland areas.

To add a second genre to this I thought about still life. To achieve this I thought about adding something which obviously didn’t belong in the image. This brought me to the idea of using stuffed animals.

In addition to that I used made use of a large boulder and shot some figures from the film Aliens.

Final Images

Wolfie

Snowy and Friend

Dragon’s over Somerset

Exercise 3.6-7600

Alien Standoff

Reflection

Combining two different genres was interesting. The toy wolf is a lot more subtle, particular in the shot where it is in amongst the grass. I think it would be easy to confuse it for a real animal if you didn’t look closely. When it’s on the rock it is a lot more obvious that it isn’t real.

With the toy panda and bear I particularly liked the shot where the lcamera lens has produced a rainbow effect which draw the attention to the panda.

The dragon was just a bit of fun.

With the Ripley and Alien photos I was trying to reproduce something I’ve seen others do where they use small figures and place them amongst normal size plants, which then seem gigantic in comparison. The close up shot, made up mostly of the rock, makes the figures almost appear as if they are in an alien landscape.

Trying to merge landscape and small objects was a challenge. I think if I was to merge landscape with some form of still life in future I’d opt for much larger objects.

Contact Sheets

A Formal Portrait

The brief for this exercise was:

How would you make a formal portrait of someone, that tells the viewer about that person’s character, life and interests but remains subtle and restrained?
Making a ‘formal’ portrait is a ‘real world’ scenario for most photographers. It’s generally a full-length portrait of a person showing their whole figure deliberately posed to be the main subject of the composition. It won’t include excessive displays of emotion or activity.
A formal portrait demands great care over the composition and the lighting. And you’ll need to make many exposures to capture a meaningful portrait from your subject. Wait for your subject to relax. Be alert to their nuances of facial expression and gesture and try to find a ‘real’ face, not a self-conscious or smiling or ‘this is how I want to be seen’ sort of face.
By juxtaposing significant elements (props, setting, clothes) in the frame, you’re setting up a Vickerkind of ‘dialogue’ between them, in which a resonance should occur, but try to remain subtle.
Before you start, research Thomas Struth’s portraits on the Tate website: www.tate.org.uk/ art/artworks?aid=2339&ws=date&wv=grid and Cecil Beaton’s work.

Research

Thomas Struth

The link in the course notes didn’t lead to any portraits and so I entered Thomas Struth into the search facility on the Tate website. This came up with a selection of Struth’s work, which I was then able to look through and find four portraits, (Struth, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991). The descriptions that accompany each of the images are very similar, with some details specific to the subjects.

Each image is the result of spending time with the subjects and getting to know them. The location for the photograph and the position of the subjects within the frame were left to them to decide, after Struth had defined some limits.

The photographs of the Shimada, Smith and Murakami families are more typical of Struth’s portrait work, with the figures being shown fully and from a distance. The photograph of Hannah Erdrich-Hartmann and Jana-Maria Hartmann is much more intimate in its nature.

The article associated with the Hartmann’s photograph suggests this is because of the intimacy between mother and daughter, and also trust between the subjects and Struth.

This difference is something that we can use in our photographs in order to provide a sense of intimacy between photographer and subject, even when one doesn’t exist, or a sense of distance when there is a close bond between the two.

Cecil Beaton

Vickers (2014) has produced a book that combines both portraits produced by Beaton of famous people taken throughout his life, as well as his observations on each of his subjects. The portraits within the book are interesting in their own right, but the addition of Cecil Beaton’s thoughts make it a much more interesting read.

Flicking through the images in the book, predominantly tend to be a lot closer to their subject than Struth’s portrait work. Beaton’s subjects are also centred within each photograph indicating that they are the important part of the image.

Beaton’s photographs are impressive because of the people who he has captured on film. So many famous people from across the decades. Royalty, aristocracy, film and music stars, writers and other artists, all were photographed by Beaton.

Portrait

When it came to actually taking the photos for this exercise I found that I didn’t have the time, so I resorted to using some portrait photos I’d taken of family and friends and using some of those.

Taking formal photos of people is something I struggle with. I find it really difficult instructing people in how and where I want them to stand. I know that this is something that comes with time and practice.

Today I was at Home Farm Festival, a local, charity, music festival. I took a number of photographs of people on stage, all I know directly or indirectly. It was so much easier taking those photos. I also found myself having chats with two guys, one asking me about the lens on my camera as he has just bought a Nikon and only has the kit lens. The other was taking photos of the band a friend sings with. He said he finds weddings hard to photograph. I can totally appreciate that.

Charlotte, Jess and Rhys

Eight years ago, my sister wanted to have some photos taken of my neices and son for our parents. Getting the wrong end of the stick, she meant a proper photoshoot with professional photographers, Rhys and I visited and I took some photos of the youngsters. The twins were quite young at the time and it was a challenge getting them to sit still long enough to get enough shots. In the end letting them watch TV while I carried on photographing them worked.

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Amy and Rhys

In 2016, my wife wanted to have some photos of Rhys and his cousin Amy so that she could give them to her Mum as a present. During a visit I took the two of them into the garden and got them to pose. Although I’ve taken photos of the two of them, along with Amy’s older brother before this was the first time I’d actively directed anyone in order to achieve a desired result.

Although there was some lack of interest in posing they both got on with it and we ended up with some images that I was really pleased with. These are also probably the last photos of the two of them before Rhys received his terminal diagnosis.

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Tash

Back in 2016, I was lucky enough to photograph Tash. We got some nice photos but during the shoot she wanted to try and recreate some iconic Marlene Dietrich photos. At the time we came up with some images that were close but I wasn’t able to achieve the end result, my photo editing skills weren’t up to the task. For this exercise I’ve taken some of those images and used Lightroom to reduce the Blacks and Shadows, and increased the Highlights. I’m hoping she likes the end results.

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References

  1. Vickers, H (Ed) Cecil Beaton Portraits & Profiles Frances Lincoln Limited 2014 ISBN 978-0-71 12-3559-2
  2. Struth, T (1991) Kyoko and Tomoharu Murakami, Tokyo 1991 Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/struth-kyoko-and-tomoharu-murakami-tokyo-1991-p77751 [Accessed 13 May 2018]
  3. Struth, T (1987) Hannah Erdrich-Hartmann and Jana-Maria Hartmann, Düsseldorf 1987 Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/struth-hannah-erdrich-hartmann-and-jana-maria-hartmann-dusseldorf-1987-p77747 [Accessed 13 May 2018]

  4. Struth, T (1989) The Smith Family, Fife, Scotland 1989 Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/struth-the-smith-family-fife-scotland-1989-p77750 [Accessed 13 May 2018]

  5. Struth, T (1986) The Shimada Family, Yamaguchi, Japan 1986 Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/struth-the-shimada-family-yamaguchi-japan-1986-p77745 [Accessed 13 May 2018]

     

A Staged Photograph (Assignment 3 – in progress)

Brief

The brief for the assignment was to produce either:-

  • A staged photograph
  • Or to make a narrative sequence

Research

When I started thinking about this assignment I happened to be reading through Photography: The Whole Story and decided to see if it had anything about staged photography. It did. A lot.

One part had a photograph by Jeff Wall called Double Self-Portrait, MoMa (2007). Seeing this sparked the idea of doing something similar, using the simplest technique I could to produce the image.

With a deadline of June 15th (extended from the 18th May) for the assignment, my initial thought for a staged photograph was to draft in the girls from the burlesque troupe and to use one of our dress rehearsals, of our routines, for Home Farm Festival for the assignment. Continuing with the theme of showing two, or more, aspects to something (the Janus image from assignment 2 and the sequence for exercise 3.3) I thought having the girls in a photo out of costume, while looking at themselves, in costume, in the same image, would be an interesting thing to try.

To achieve something believable would mean controlling all aspects of the environment but particular lighting.

As part of the preparation for the assignment I took several photos at the dance studio we use. In one of the photographs there is a chair on the left hand side of the image, in the other there is a chair on the right hand side. Both photos were cropped so that they contained just over half the photograph, with just enough overlap for Photoshop to stitch the two photos together into a single image. Doing this proved that my aim for the project was possible.

Gregory Crewdson

The course notes suggested looking at Crewdson’s work found at http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/p/gregory-crewson/

Gregory Crewdsons work is “is meticulously planned and staged, in particular the lighting. In some instances, extra lighting and special effects such as artificial rain or dry ice are used to enhance a natural moment of twilight. In others, the effect of twilight is entirely artificially created.”

The link to Crewdson’s work relates to his work Twilight and contains a number of examples of the images he produced for that project. When looking at some of these images it is easy to imagine that some of them were caught at the exact right moment, in some of the others it is obvious that the scene is staged. For instance in his image of a car in the middle of a junction with a door wide open. There is no reason for the door being open, which leaves you wondering what is happening, has someone got out of the car, is the door open ready for someone to get in?

Another image that suggests it is staged is set outside a supermarket. The figure and car at the front of the scene suggest someone putting groceries in their car but the figures stance appears unnatural, almost mannequin like.

Loh. A, Vescovi. A, (2015) has an example of the image that stood out for me. It is of a woman stood alongside a car, with a bag of groceries on the bonnet and a second bag, spilled on the ground. A girl sits in the passenger seat while another girl stands in front of the car with her head down, only wearing underwear.

The woman by the car has a disappointed, disapproving look on her face.

The girl in front of the car has marks across her back.

What makes this image stand out for me is the figure of the girl. She has short hair, her arms are positioned in such a way that they hide parts of her body. It is a very androgynous look which leaves the possibility that this is not quite as it seems, is the figure actually a girl?

Untitled from Twilight - Gregory Crewdon - VAM.AC.UK
Untitled from Twilight – Gregory Crewdon – VAM.AC.UK

Hannah Starkey

Tate (un-dated) shows an example of Hannah Starkey’s work from 1999. The image is of two women in a bathroom/changing room. The arm of one of the women is partially in the shot but what you see of them is mainly their reflections, and the reflections of their reflections. Starkey has cleverly positioned the camera so that the woman closest to the mirror is visible between the first reflection of the second woman and her reflection in the mirror she is looking into. Almost as if the first woman is coming between the second woman and her reflection.

Starkey’s work involves staged scenes and the use of actors, Saatchi Gallery (2018). Her work explores “everyday experiences and observations of inner city life from a female perspective”, Wikipedia (2018) .

Starkey’s work also involves the use of mirrors, reflections and smoke. In an interview with Diarmuid Costello, The Telegraph (2011), Hannah Starkey about the use of mirrors in her work acts as an escape route in the image.

Starkey’s images are also very static with no obvious movement and no sense that the participants are conversing with each other. This is her way of ensuring that the images aren’t a mass of contradictions.

Final Images

Watching the Performers

Fire Bat

Fire Bat 01 - 72dpi 1024 pixelFire Bat 03 - 72dpi 1024 pixelFire Bat 04 - 72dpi 1024 pixelFire Bat 02 - 72dpi 1024 pixel

 

Reflection

 

Contact Sheets

 

References

  1. Tate (un-dated) Hannah Starkey born 1971 Available at: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/hannah-starkey-2683 [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  2. Saatchi Gallery (2018) Hannah Starkey: Selected works by Hannah Starkeey Available at:   https://www.saatchigallery.com/artists/hannah_starkey.htm [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  3. Wikipedia (2018) Hanna Starkey Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Starkey [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  4. Artnet (2018) Hanna Starkey Available at:  http://www.artnet.com/artists/hannah-starkey/ [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  5. The Telegraph (2011) Hanna Starkey: In Conversation Available at:  https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/photography/8283609/Hannah-Starkey-In-Conversation.html [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  6. Loh. A, Vescovi. A, (2015) Interview with the Photographer Available at: http://theamericanreader.com/interview-with-photographer-gregory-crewdson/ [Accessed 28 May 2018]
  7. MoMA (2007) Jeff Wall – In His Own Words. Available at: https://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2007/jeffwall/ [Accessed 5 June 2018]