Shutter Speed

The brief for exercise 1.10 was to make a series of experiments bracketing only the shutter speed.

Having completed the assignment the first thing I found looking at the images I’ve chosen to use is that in order to get the right exposure I’ve not only adjusted the shutter speed but altered the aperture.

The second thing is that to get the effects I’ve wanted the difference in aperture is quite different and not just a change of 1 up or down.

Exercise 1.10 Ball water feature fast shutter
Water feature at St Margaret’s Hospice (f/2.8, 1/160 sec)

In the above image the faster shutter speed has allowed for bubbles and the ripples in the water was it cascades down the metal sphere to be captured. It has given a nice texture to the surface that I think compliments the pebbles that the ball is resting on.

Exercise 1.10 Ball water feature slow shutter
Water feature at St Margaret’s Hospice (f/3.5, 1/50 sec)

The faster shutter speed has removed any sign of bubbles and smoothed out the ripples giving only a hint at the top of the sphere where the water bubbles out of the top.

If I’d increased the time for the exposure further then the water cascading down would have blended with the metal material of the globe.

Exercise 1.10 Cefn Coed cemetery river view fom bridge highlighted and black adjusted long shutter
Cefn Coed cemetery river view from bridge (f/29, 1.3 sec)

By setting a slow shutter speed the waves and ripples on the river that separates the two parts of the cemetery where my grandparents are buries, the surface looks a lot smoother than it was in reality. It could almost be frozen over.

Exercise 1.10 Cefn Coed cemetery river view fom bridge highlighted and black adjusted short shutter
Cefn Coed cemetery river view from bridge (f/8, 1/13 sec)

The faster shutter speed shows that the river is very much in motion. Flowing fast enough that you can hear it rushing through the trees as you approach.

Exercise 1.10 Cefn Coed cemetery river view fom bridge highlighted and black adjusted
Cefn Coed cemetery river view from bridge (f/29, 0.8 sec)

 

Exercise 1.10 Cefn Coed cemetery river view fom bridge
Cefn Coed cemetery river view from bridge (f/4.2, 1/15 sec)

This was shot from the other side of the bridge with a fast shutter speed so you can see the ripples on the surface. The shots I took with the slower shutter didn’t work as well on this side as they did from the other side of the bridge.

 

Exercise 1.10 Hendford Hill bridge dog
Hendford Hill bridge dog (f/10, 1/8 sec)

 

I was taking photos of the bridge for the Shadows and Light project. When I came to review them I noticed this dog that had just popped into the frame.

 

Exercise 1.10 Hendford Hill bridge runners
Hendford Hill bridge runners (f/22, 1 sec)

 

With the above photo I noticed the runners coming and as I was propped with my back against a tree decided I’d increase the shutter time and capture them as they moved through the shot. I decided against focusing on them and panning so that it wasn’t obvious I was taking a photograph of them.

I think the different amounts of blurring on the runners and the couple walking nicely highlights the different speeds they were travelling at.

During this exercise I focussed on varying the shutter speed in order to get the effect of movement. In the past I’ve used panning to achieve similar effects. I’ve found this to be a lot more challenging as you need to have the subject in focus and be panning at exactly the right speed so that when you press the shutter release your subject doesn’t end up out of shot or to one side or the other.

The following, taken during the British Grand Prix at Silverstone this  year, show some of the problems that can occur when trying to capture fast moving objects including when panning in order to take the photograph. Like anything practice makes it easier.

 

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